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dc.contributor.authorSchumacher, Jacob
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-04T19:02:30Z
dc.date.available2016-02-04T19:02:30Z
dc.date.created2005
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/771
dc.description.abstractLandscaping of the soil takes on multiple forms and shapes throughout the countries on earth, and since the beginning of society and the development of architecture, many have tried to find the perfect design for their perfect lawn. There are multiple people that try and take the earths shape into their own hands and mold their own pieces of the land. Some have tried with the normal and dull, chemically infested, green lawn concept. While others have gone out on a limb and introduced a new concept, where less is more in a lawn. An idea of wild growth and multiple flowers/shrubs was introduced. The lawn must be both visually and politically correct and pleasing; this concept is hard to accomplish while having both goals fulfilled. But with the great pursuit of this concept that green is better, comes the most devastating aspect, "chemicals." A mass amount of chemicals have an unnatural effect on human behavior and human health. With this ability to change the soil and add unnatural compounds, the knowledge of what we are doing to the earth and to the soils must not be over looked. People must tum their love affair with the lawn into a healthy and safe love affair. Every year Americans spend more than 750 million dollars on grass seed, do-it yourself lawn, and garden care (Scott, 2004). Making the lawn and landscaping industry one of the highest grossing industries in America. And even though the great American lawn, a coast to coast carpet of green, inspires six billion dollars in annual spending, the lawn care companies are doing one and half billion dollars of business a year. The United States applies between 50 and 80 million pounds of toxic chemicals in the process (Scott, 2004). This is why the purpose of this research paper is for Americans to take a further investigation into more adequate landscaping techniques and practices, in order to prevent further damage to soils, grasses, animals and most importantly, humans. These results will be viewed through two very detailed and narrowed studies on how we can see the changes that are being made to the earth.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectAmericanen
dc.subjectLandscapingen
dc.subjectComparingen
dc.subjectImpact of Chemicalsen
dc.subjectversusen
dc.subjectOrganicsen
dc.subjectHuman Healthen
dc.subjectSoilen
dc.titleAmerican Landscaping: Comparing the Impacts of Chemicals Versus Organics on Human Health and Soilsen
dc.typeThesisen


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