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dc.contributor.authorNush, Kyle
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-22T04:50:17Z
dc.date.available2018-02-22T04:50:17Z
dc.date.created2017-05-31
dc.date.issued2017-05-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/6265
dc.description.abstractWolves play an important role in our ecosystems. They are at the top of the food chain, they control many subspecies population from getting out of control such as moose and deer. But lately we have seen an increase in deer and moose populations, one of the reasons being the decline of the wolf population. Humans believe they are a nuisance or they are afraid of wolves. They think wolves will attack them if they come in contact with one of them. When humans grow up, they are taught to see wolves with a negative aspect. In folklore, the big bad wolf in the three little pigs, the wolf in little red riding hood, we have these negative views of wolves. This in part makes people afraid of wolves and lead to the mass killing of wolves for sport. Today, wolves are currently classified under the Endangered Species Act as they try to recover their population numbers. This study focuses on the wolves in Minnesota and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to see if wolves in thrive better in higher forest percent coverage habitats. Radio collared wolf data was collected from each state's DNR, and habitat quality was determined using a land cover layer in ArcGIS. Results found that Gray Wolves do not thrive or are not influenced by high forest percent coverage.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectGray Wolvesen
dc.subjectGreat Lakes Regionen
dc.subjectHabitaten
dc.subjectGISen
dc.subjectPopulationen
dc.titleImpact of Habitat Quality on Gray Wolves Morphometrics In the Great Lakes Regionen
dc.typeThesisen


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