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dc.contributor.authorLanderholm, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-30T12:59:07Z
dc.date.available2015-09-30T12:59:07Z
dc.date.created2015-05-30
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/586
dc.description.abstractThe popularity of the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) has exploded, but the quality of golf played has not. Despite easier course set-ups, LPGA players fail to match the scores recorded by members of Professional Golfers Association (PGA). Some experts argue that evolution is to blame, and not a lack of skill; men are stronger and always will be. Statistical analysis suggest otherwise. While women struggle with driving distance compared to men, both are evenly-matched in other strength categories. Some members of the LPGA even excel. The explanation for disparity lies elsewhere, and will be found by looking at the opposite end of the spectrum: the short game. Putting is one of the least athletic parts of golf. However, this part of the game is overlooked and under-emphasized. Research shows that it is not an important part of golf, but it is the most important area of the game.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCarthage College Mathematics Departmenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectGolfen
dc.subjectPGA Touren
dc.subjectLPGAen
dc.subjectGender
dc.titleBattle of the Sexes: Is Professional Golf Two Separate Games?en
dc.typeThesisen


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