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dc.contributor.authorMcBride, Katherine
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-14T15:11:38Z
dc.date.available2022-07-14T15:11:38Z
dc.date.created2000
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.carthage.edu/handle/20.500.13007/12739
dc.description.abstractParents, educators, and researchers believe that self-concept and intellectual ability are the contributing factors to academic success (Yauman, 1980). Educators have the responsibility of implementing educational techniques that promote academic success. Peer tutoring is one such method in which one student, acting as a tutor, works with another student on academic tasks. Studies have shown that peer tutoring increases self-concept in students. In this study, the relationship between cross age peer tutoring and self-concept will be examined to determine if it is a beneficial program. The specific purpose of this study is to explore the effect of cross age peer tutoring on the self-concept of seventh grade students with learning disabilities (LD). Nine first-grade students were chosen as tutees by the first grade teacher based on low performance on word recognition tests. Nine seventh grade students from a self contained cross categorical (SCCC) classroom were trained to tutor the first graders. Tutors and tutees met for 30 minutes once per week for ten weeks. Tutors used ten target words that were derived from each student's pretest as subject matter for the first grade tutees. The dependent variable for this study was self-concept. Before tutor training began, the seventh grade tutors and a similar SCCC classroom serving as a control group were given the Piers-Harris self-concept Scale (PHSCS) to establish a baseline. The purpose of this survey was to measure any changes in self-concept due to the intervention. After ten tutoring sessions, the students were given the same self-concept inventory. A second dependent variable was the acceptability ratings of tutors. A Peer Tutor Protocol Checklist was developed to monitor how accurately they performed each tutoring task. Results indicated that the experimental and control groups had significant increases in self concept on the overall test scores. The students and teacher involved in this study were surveyed on the effectiveness of the program after the intervention was over. The teacher observed that the students being tutored were more confident about reading aloud. She also believed that the time used to prepare and maintain this program was well spent. Tutors concluded that training was appropriate and the tutoring was a positive learning experience for themselves and their tutee. Tutees indicated satisfaction with their tutors and the content being taught. In addition to the surveys, a word recognition post test was given to the tutees to determine the percentage of words learned over the course of the ten week program. The lowest score was 86% and the remaining scores fell between 100% and 95%. In summary, the improved reading skills of tutees and positive student and teacher attitudes indicated that the program was successful.en_US
dc.subjectpeer tutoren_US
dc.subjectlearning disabilityen_US
dc.subjectmiddle schoolen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Cross-Age Peer Tutoring on the Self-Concept of Seventh Grade Students with Learning Disabilitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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