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dc.contributor.authorJones, Jacqueline
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-21T16:20:36Z
dc.date.available2020-05-21T16:20:36Z
dc.date.created2020-05
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.carthage.edu/handle/123456789/9657
dc.description.abstractBiodiversity around the world has been declining,and one of the major contributors of its decline are invasive species. Invasive species can rapidly spread, and have disproportionate effects on communities,butitisrelativelyunknownhowinteractionsbetweentwoormoreinvasivespecies in the same environment may affect each other or their environment. Using data from a paper by Adler et al (2018), different interactions between invasive/invasive, native/native, and native/invasive, were measured and compared, and the results used in creating a future greenhouse study for observinginvasivebiodiversityusinggrowthandpopulations.Itwasfound that invasive/invasive interactions were the least competitive, and that they had stronger effects. From these results, it was predicted that the study’s results would mean that the more biodiverse group of invasives would either have significantly more growth or populations. These results would also be helpful in managing invasive plant species, as well as how they multiple invasives may interact in different plant communities.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInvasive Plant Species Interactionsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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