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dc.contributor.authorWonsil, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-19T04:05:30Z
dc.date.available2019-02-19T04:05:30Z
dc.date.created2018-12
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/7930
dc.description.abstractThe current imbalance of the carbon cycle on Earth has placed a need for research into the monitoring of carbon sinks and sources. At localized scales many methods exist which can be used to precisely monitor how carbon is entering and exiting a system. However, given the global environmental change the world may be facing, techniques for carbon monitoring on broader systems are necessary. Previously, remotely sensed data and the use of vegetation indices have been employed to monitor carbon fluxes from orbit. However, these techniques are not perfect. More recently, studies have evaluated the use of solar-induced fluorescence as a more direct method for carbon monitoring. This study seeks to continue this evaluation by comparing data from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 satellite to field sampled data from the U.S. Forest Service. The results indicate a possible variance in accuracy across biomes; however, these results could be due to the comparison between production and productivity.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectsolar-induced fluorescenceen
dc.subjectSIFen
dc.subjectOCO-2en
dc.subjectremote sensingen
dc.subjectbiomassen
dc.subjectforestsen
dc.subjectcarbon monitoringen
dc.titleEvaluation of Remotely Sensed Solar-Induced Fluorescence from OCO-2 as a Proxy for Productivity with the Forest Inventory Analysis Databaseen
dc.typeThesisen


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