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dc.contributor.authorAkinyi, Ooko-Ombaka
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-27T21:32:02Z
dc.date.available2014-09-27T21:32:02Z
dc.date.created2014-05
dc.date.issued2014-09-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/478
dc.descriptionUsing soil science as a medium to determine the collective impacts of terrestrial invasives on the biogeochemical structure of soils in Kenosha, WIen_US
dc.description.abstractThe redistribution of organisms beyond their geographical range can result in a number of associated problems including the emergence and proliferation of biological invaders more commonly known as invasive, exotic, alien or foreign species. Invasive plants are not only capable of modifying how natural ecosystem function by means of native species displacement, but also have the ability to change the biogeochemical conditions of the soil making it preferable to other invasives. This work is an extension of the Invasive Species Working Group; a long term invasive monitoring initiative that monitored- terrestrial species along 3 lakes in Kenosha County using a modified transect-quadrat sampling method. Observations carried out along within quadrats included species richness, species type, native and invasive abundance and species richness. Additionally 3 soil samples were collected at random within each quadrat and later assessed based on macronutrients, pH, texture, colour, salinity, cation exchange capacity, water holding capacity, porosity, and, bulk density. Though p values were above the significance level of 0.05 for all factors taken into consideration, the relatively high quantities of inputs of cation exchange capacity (>50mmhos/100g), water holding capacity (>50%), and soil porosity (>65%) provide reason to believe that invasive species abundance is practically significant in that invasive species are associated in lieu of altering soil based ecosystem changes. Overall, some of the shortcomings in data collection and analysis such as data set size, accuracy of soil testing protocols and quantitative vs. qualitative assessments, may have contributed to statistical insignificance, in addition to extraneous variables such as drought and growing season.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCarthage College - Environmental Science Senior Thesisen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUsing soil science as a medium to determine the collective impacts of terrestrial invasives on the biogeochemical structure of soils in Kenosha, WIen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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