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dc.contributor.authorMendoza, Amanda
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-26T18:55:43Z
dc.date.available2014-09-26T18:55:43Z
dc.date.created2014-05
dc.date.issued2014-09-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/469
dc.descriptionDreissena polymorpha: An Observational Chemical Attachment Studyen_US
dc.description.abstractZebra Mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are an invasive species that have taken over many of the waterways within the United States, specifically the waterways of the Great Lakes region. Due to its ability to attach to almost any substrate both in and on the water’s surface with its byssal threads, Z. polymorpha are responsible for destabilizing docks, sinking marker buoys, weighing down watercraft, and clogging water facility intake pipes, costing consumers millions of dollars per year. In this study, Zinc and Magnesium multi-vitamin tablets were crushed and physically applied to different PVC pipe substrates. Three separate three day trials of this experiment were conducted to make a comparison with how effective each chemical was in preventing byssal thread attachment to the substrate. It was found that zinc was more effective than magnesium in preventing attachment. The importance of this experiment is that some chemicals are more effective in preventing zebra mussel attachment than others. This information can help researchers and engineers in designing anthropogenic substrates infused with chemicals that can minimize zebra mussel attachment.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCarthage College - Environmental Science Senior Thesisen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDreissena polymorpha: An Observational Chemical Attachment Studyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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