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dc.contributor.authorSkluzacek, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-09T19:11:24Z
dc.date.available2012-08-09T19:11:24Z
dc.date.created2012-05-17
dc.date.issued2012-08-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/305
dc.description.abstractSound localization is very important to the acoustic community due to its capacity to replicate audio environments. Surround sound systems, theaters, and audio engineers all use localization techniques to give a listener the sensation that they are hearing realistic sounds. The purpose of this experiment was to design a procedure to test and model the localization accuracy of human hearing in the azimuthal plane. Although more testing needs to be completed to reduce the large error due to lack of a large collection of trials, trends have emerged from the data to show that localization is more accurate in the front than on the sides. Data shows that the variation in localization has approximately 15 degrees of error directly in front and continues to increase to 36 degrees of error at a listener angle of 60 degrees relative to the speaker location. Another trend shows that at extremely high frequencies, localization averages decrease. For frequencies of 300Hz, 1kHz, and 3kHz, localization averages were approximately 20 +/- 4 degrees, but for 10kHz the average was only 15 +/- 1.3 degrees. Based off of these trends a qualitative model and its features have been constructed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectPhysicsen_US
dc.subjectsound
dc.subjecthuman hearing
dc.titleAngular Resolution of Human Sound Localizationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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