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dc.contributor.authorKoenes, Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-15T14:01:36Z
dc.date.available2012-05-15T14:01:36Z
dc.date.created2010-11
dc.date.issued2012-05-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/284
dc.description.abstractCarbamazepine (CBZ) is an anticonvulsant, currently on the market, that has a low absorption rate into the body (bioavailability). Microemulsions and metal crystals have been proposed as ways to increase bioavailability by acting as directors for the packing structure of CBZ when forming crystals. CBZ crystals were formed using both techniques and then were examined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optical Light Microscopy, and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy. Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Optical Light Microscopy, 3-D crystal structures were made in microemulsions below 30% water-in-oil and 2-D and 1-D crystal structures were made in microemulsions above 30% water-in-oil. Also, these crystals have weaker intermolecular forces. For the metal crystals, the size of the metal center affects the arrangement of the CBZ in the monolayer which resulted in different chiral arrangements of CBZ. Both methods can be used to direct the packing structure of CBZ into crystals in hopes of improving bioavailability.en_US
dc.subjectCarbamazepineen_US
dc.subjectMicroemulsions
dc.subjectMonolayers
dc.subjectBioavailabilty
dc.titleCarbamazepine Microemulsions and Carbamazepine Monolayers used to direct crystal structure to increase bioavailabiltyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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